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approach to reducing the nation's deficit. let's bring in our panel. mary katharine ham editor-at-large of hot air.com and fox news contributor. peter mirijanian former advisor to the clinton-gore and gore-lieberman campaigns. when the president arrives at the white house to speak, he will have people behind him, ordinary americans who reached out to the white house and want their $2,000 middle class tax cut preserved. republicans are saying this is essentially a campaign stunt, a campaign appearance kind of event of the he won the election. he should get on the business of governing. what do you say? >> well, one quick observation, jon. i think what you're seeing, what i think is interesting the first social media presidency. this administration using technology and using social media to advance their agenda. but look, all presidents do this. george w. bush after his re-election famously said he has now the political capital he intend to use. so going to the public and going sort of over the head of congress is something democratic and republican presidents always do what they
the typical washington show game and take a few bills. if we want to cut the budget deficit we have to look at everything that's been passed and make decisions against each of those. if obama-care is the most important policy considered its survives. if there are other things being considered it doesn't survive. that's the only way to approach cliff that's running out very quickly. rick: if there is a deal spending cuts have to be put on the table and obama-care cost a lot of money. >> that's not true. it cuts the deficit in a 10-year period and even more so over 20 years. john boehner said in his own op-ed that he tried two different ways to get rid of obama-care, going to the supreme court and in the election. they tried 33 times to repeal obama-care in the congress and failed all 33 times. the bottom line is now we have obama-care. it is the law of the lands. we need to take the off the table and focus on the bush tax cuts which american voters decided they want to keep for people under $250,000 and they want to get rid of for people making more than $250,000. rick: obama-care lowers the
and we'll have another trillion dollar deficit according to cbo moving into next year and we can't afford anymore like that. if we take what obama would be willing to support which is increase in the age of, again recipients and other type of reforms like that, then we have a legitimate negotiation as we move into it. but when you have liberal members of the democratic party stepping forward and saying before the process begins they will not accept any type of entitlement reform, it makes it untenable process from the beginning. jon: is it no entitlement reform, simon, or is it perhaps entitlement reform when it comes to medicare? i haven't heard anybody talk about reforming social security on democratic side? >> that is good question and i think, look i think we're in the early stages, chris, of this whole debate. eric cantor went on morning joe said and won't raise taxes on anybody under any circumstance which would you argue is stopping negotiations. both sides are laying out positions right now. there are negotiations going on. clearly the fiscal cliff is scaring everybody into action
a dent in the deficit or the national debt. the government is a ravenous beast. jon: that is the point, that monica makes. even if you take the tax rates back for the richest americans to where president obama says today really should be, you're really not going to take care of the national debt in a significant way. >> no, you're not. but, you know, these republicans that talk about this today, most of them voted in the senate and the house for the medicare prescription drug plan under or george bush. that exploded the deficit tremendously. both of them voted for two wars, even if you think they were necessary, with no offsetting revenue to fund those wars. when you have spending like that that these republicans backed ten years ago, never had a problem with, and all of a sudden now they're saying we've got principles, you know, where were these principles ten years ago? >> first of all, fiscal conservatives like me were screaming at president bush and others who went down -- >> but where was the primary for those people? >> but remember, remember, the deficit that president bush left
are the major drivers of the deficit and debt. listen, if you raise taxes as the administration wants to do now, you don't, in other words, extend the bush-era tax cuts, you raise $824 billion over ten years. now the u.s. government is funded, it takes $1.3 billion a day to fund the u.s. government. so you divide all of that, do the math, carry the knot and basically you qui get about 65 days of funding of the u.s. government just on the taxes. it doesn't get you too far on the big picture. jon: i've heard some democrats saying maybe it won't be such a bad thing to let the country go over the fiscal cliff at lowe's for a short period of time. >> reporter: that is one negotiation ploy, i think you're hearing that as well, you know, if you go past that deadline, then the new congress could come back and retroactively essentially give them -- everyone a tax cut, so those new congressmen and women, and senators will be able to say that they had a tax cut. it's all semantics here. the bottom line is what the president will bring, what house speaker john boehner will be and the closed-door negotiatio
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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